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Puff Ball Mushroom Soup with Tarragon

If you can find a puffball (Big – I mean huge – white round fungus that is found in Sept/Oct at Sugar Ridge) then use this in addition, or instead of whatever other mushrooms you have.

Ingredients

  • 4 -5 Onions, sliced
  • 8 cups sliced Brown Cremini Mushrooms (or whatever you have – older mushrooms have more flavour so check the reduced rack at the grocery store)
  • 3-6 cloves Garlic, minced (as much as you like)
  • 1 – 2 tbsp. Dried Tarragon
  • 1 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 2 – 4 cups water
  • 1 cup Almond milk (soy or rice are fine too)
  • 4 bouillon cubes (use organic veggie, or mushroom flavours)

 Preparation

  1. In a soup pot, slowly fry the onions and garlic in water to caramelize them.  They will become translucent, then brown, then almost liquid.  Basically liquid, sweet goo – yumm!
  2. Add the sliced mushrooms and fry until soft.
  3. Add the water to just cover the mushrooms, bouillon cubes, Bragg’s or soy sauce, & tarragon. Simmer for about 20 minutes. Use homemade veggie broth in place of the bouillon if you want.
  4. Puree using a hand blender in the pot, or use a blender, mixing small batches at a time and transferring to another pot.
  5. A variation in texture is to blend half the soup and leave half chunky.
  6. If the soup is too thick, add milk to thin it a bit. This soup wants to be thick though so don’t overdo it!
  7. Salt & pepper to taste. Serve with crusty bread & not so crusty friends.

A Taste of Turkey ~ Muhammara Dip

With Liz on retreat in Turkey at the moment, we thought why not share this recipe for Muhammara Dip!  This is a sweet and spicy taste of Turkey, and is quickly becoming the latest substitute for hummus.

Ingredients

3/4 cup pomegranate juice
3 red bell peppers, washed
3 Tbsp bread crumbs – panko is best
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes (more if you like it hot)
1 clove garlic,  minced
1/2 cup raw walnuts, loosely chopped (use a seed if you need nut free)
1 Tbsp olive oil – optional
2 Tbsp lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Heat the pomegranate juice in a small saucepan over a medium heat until it reaches a low boil. Then reduce heat to a steady simmer (low/medium low) and cook for 20-30 minutes or until reduced by half. Set aside to cool.  Voila:  pomegranate molasses!
  2. While the juice is reducing, heat oven to 450 degrees F and place whole bell peppers directly on a baking sheet. Roast for 20-25 minutes or until blackened on the outside. Cover with foil to let steam and cool for 10 minutes.  When cool enough to handle, peel away the core, seeds, and skins and set aside, keeping the red pepper flesh.
  3. In a food processor, combine all the ingredients except the roasted pepper flesh.  Use a pulse setting instead of blend so that you can choose the degree of puree you want and either leave more texture or try it very smooth.
  4. Then add the flesh of the roasted peppers and pulse a few more times to combine.  Taste and adjust flavor as you like; adding more lemon for acidity, garlic for “zing,” chili flakes for spicy heat, pomegranate molasses for sweetness / depth of flavor, sea salt for saltiness, or cumin for smokiness.
  5. Serve with fresh pita, crackers, or vegetables of choice! This tastes best when fresh but it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days in a sealed container.   This is nice served warm but at the very least room temperature.

Protein Ponderings

Sugar Ridge has been serving guests plant-based meals for 10 years now.  Over the years I’ve been routinely asked 2 questions.   “How do you get enough protein” and “Why don’t you serve meat here”? So I thought I’d address them here.

Most people don’t have the opportunity to experience their body on a meatless diet.  If you don’t know what you don’t know, why would you change?  Most guests leave saying they would like to eat more vegetarian food if only they knew how to prepare it.   The experience of one’s own body thriving, feeling increased vitality in just a couple days speaks for itself.  People leave Sugar Ridge knowing they can thrive without meat.  The experience is education enough. 

Side Effects of Eating Meat

I don’t want this to turn into a rant so I’ll suggest that you look into a few facts that in general, we try to avoid and which, in my opinion, if everyone cared about, there would be an end to suffering when it comes to food.  In no particular order these are other reasons we don’t serve meat:

  • lack of arable land – deforestation to graze cattle, loss of rainforest
  • lack of fresh uncontaminated water – most available fresh water feeds domestic livestock
  • starving people – grains used to feed livestock could feed far more people than the flesh of those animals
  • obesity epidemic – unhealthy foods are cheap
  • many diseases directly affected by meat consumption include diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, osteoporosis, arthritis
  • animal cruelty – no animal destined for slaughter is happy with the process
  • dairy isn’t meant for human consumption and contributes to illness, including osteoporosis
  • global warming – according to the UN the livestock industry creates 55% of greenhouse gases (methane from livestock is worse than CO2)
  • the meat industry is not sustainable – we’re running out of land as the human population grows
  • low nutrient quality of food – factory farming depletes the soil, GMO’s – we still don’t know long term effects
  • focus on macronutrients (protein, fat & carbs) leaves the body hungry for missing micronutrients, so we keep eating

My focus here at Sugar Ridge is mindfulness and food has always been a big part of that whether guests know it or not.  The present moment is the one in which we have power to influence our health, wellness and the wellbeing of the planet.  The decisions made in the present moment affect our future individually and as a species collectively.  The decision to eat meat or not is one of those opportunities.  So much suffering is attributed to the meat and dairy industries.  And not just the suffering of the animals involved, but the human suffering as diseases become normal, lifespan is now decreasing, forests are destroyed, people are displaced, and water is contaminated. 

The main reason we don’t serve meat is that I refuse to participate in the harm of your body, the harm of animals and the harm of the planet through global warming.

The Protein Myth

The protein answer is pretty easy and it’s really just about education.  Most people are misinformed about nutrition in general and get their dietary education from the media, from the plethora of food commercials, from good intentioned (but uneducated about nutrition) health professionals and a lot from powerful food lobby groups.  It’s easy to see how people get misinformed when everywhere they turn they’re told to eat more protein, carbs are bad and fat is good (or bad) depending on the day.  Just think about who’s paying for that ad.  The protein myth is one that can be dispelled quite easily. 

Protein is one of the three macronutrients needed by our bodies. The other two are carbohydrates and fats. Our bodies need each of these for proper cell functioning.  Metabolic processes happen with the aid of enzymes and every enzyme is made of protein strands.  The body itself is made of proteins.  The paradox of protein is that it is not only essential in your diet but too much threatens your health and is linked to serious illnesses like cancer, heart disease and diabetes.  It’s virtually unheard of for healthy people who have access to food in general to have a protein deficiency.  On the other hand, many people need to reduce protein under doctor’s orders.

The myth part of the protein craze stems from the fact that animal protein is called complete, whereas most vegetable proteins, but not all, are called incomplete.  Protein is made up of various amino acids and every plant has many amino acids but few have all of them in the proportions we need to thrive.  Thus they are called incomplete proteins.  Animal flesh, dairy and eggs are complete proteins because they contain all of the amino acids.  But that doesn’t mean you will have a protein deficiency by not eating meat or dairy.          

When you eat protein-containing foods, the digestion process breaks down protein into amino acids to make them available for use by your body. Nine of the 20 amino acids are essential because our bodies cannot make them on their own. This means we must get them from our diets. We don’t need to consume protein; we need to consume amino acids. 

Vegetables have protein too!

Complete proteins in the vegetable world include quinoa, hemp seeds, soy products, carrots, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cucumbers, kale, okra, peas, cauliflower, corn, eggplant, potatoes, summer squash, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, and bananas.  

We do not need all essential amino acids from one food or meal because our bodies are able to store amino acids for future use.  Food combining used to be popular but now it is understood that you don’t have to consume all amino acids in the same meal or even in the same day.  Although all vegetable foods have protein, some have more than others.  You can divide the vegetable world into seeds, nuts, legumes and grains with the combination of any two providing all essential amino acids.  We naturally combine these foods because they taste great together, so it really takes no effort to get all amino acids.  For example, a peanut butter sandwich, rice and beans, hummus with pita bread, lentils with rice or quinoa, a wrap with tempeh and so on contain all essential amino acids.  Note this doesn’t take into account the protein in vegetables and fruits. If you eat a variety of whole foods throughout the day, you get enough protein.

A vegan diet has plenty of protein, as well as minerals and vitamins and micronutrients that a healthy body needs.  Animals that are killed to be consumed by people have plant-based diets, getting all their protein from the plants they eat.   Cows are huge just eating grass (it’s also where they get their calcium).  Every plant has some protein in it.  All protein ultimately comes from plants, either by consuming an animal that consumed the plant, or consuming the plant itself.  Eating the plant is easier on your digestion.

Protein and Disease

According to the World Health Organization most North Americans consume more than double the recommended dietary intake of protein.  The WHO suggests we should have 4.5 % of our calories from protein.  You probably don’t need as much protein as you think, and you’re more than likely getting enough, even if you follow a vegetarian or vegan diet or even a raw vegan diet.

Many diets that have been popular over the last few years have had a focus on high protein and low carbs.  These diets actually promote weight gain over time.  Animal flesh is denser than plant foods, has no fibre, and has a much higher caloric count by volume, taking up much less space in your stomach than an equivalent amount of calories from plant matter which has a lot of fibre.  So, you tend to eat more calories since you don’t feel full, and you can miss out on micronutrients which your body needs, leaving you still feeling hungry despite the calories you’ve consumed.   

People who consume animal products with every meal are taking in approximately 5 times the recommended amount of daily protein.

I encourage you to do your own research and don’t take my word for it.  I am intentionally leaving out references so that you will go find your own.  The truth is out there!  I know I was surprised, angry and disappointed the more I learned.  The science is there.  Match what you find to your own body and eat so that you thrive.  The same diet isn’t right for everyone.  Find yours and don’t be fanatical about it or it causes more stress which will undo all the good that the diet does.  Plant-based eating can include meat, just not much.  If you want to transition to eating a more plant-based diet think about the starch, fat and veggie side of a meal and build around that.

Mushroom Stroganoff

This is an old recipe that Liz has had for years and slipped it into the cookbook on a whim, but we’ve been getting a lot of wonderful feedback on this recipe! Try it for yourself and let us know your thoughts. 

Mushroom Stroganoff

This was one of those comfort foods I used to love as a kid.  My mom would make a huge pot of it (with beef and sour cream back then) and we’d eat it for a couple days.  Now I make it with mushrooms in place of the meat but same old goodness and hug for the tummy.  My mom would serve it over egg noodles but any wider noodle like linguini or fettuccini are fine too.

Ingredients:

  • 1 12-ounce package fettuccini or linguini
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 1 large chopped onion
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 cups fresh mushrooms – use a variety (cremini, oyster, shitake, button) and if they’re small enough leave them whole
  • dash of cayenne
  • 3 tablespoons white wine
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 cup soy or nut milk
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch mixed in 1 cup cold water
  • fresh ground pepper
  • fresh tarragon (or dried if you don’t have any available)

Instructions:

  • Place the water, onions and garlic in a large pan and cook for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add mushrooms and cook until they soften.
  • Add all remaining ingredients, except for the cornstarch mixture. Mix well and cover.
  • Cook over low heat for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Remove lid if too much liquid is accumulating from the mushrooms.
  • While this simmers, cook the pasta according to directions on package.
  • Slowly add cornstarch mixture to pan, stirring as you add it and stop when sauce is thickened to your desire.  Discard any excess cornstarch mixture.
  • Ideally the pasta is ready when the sauce is finishing.  After draining the pasta transfer it back into the pot and spoon some of the sauce into the pasta coating it well so it doesn’t get sticky.  Serve immediately with mushroom mixture over fettuccini.
  • Garnish with tarragon.

 

Lemon Tahini Dressing

This salad dressing is super easy to make and a guest favourite.  Its lemony, sweet and tangy flavour is great on any salad.

2 tablespoons tahini
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

Mix ingredients and drizzle – or use as a veggie dip.

 

 

 

 

Chef’s Tip: Our awesome cook, Sam, did a ingenious variation of this recipe.  She removed the vinegar, added water instead, along with some icing sugar and made a drizzle that we used on cookies. Delicious!

Make Your Own Dandelion Salve! It’s Easy!

It’s Dandelion time!

We love these wonderful little flowers! Seeing their sunny faces dotting the countryside is a sure sign that summer is on its way.  Besides trumpeting in a new season, dandelions provide loads of nutrition and are pretty multi-talented when it comes to providing health benefits. 

The entire plant is edible and the flower serves as the main ingredient in a salve for dry skin and especially eczema.  Plus, foraging for these flowers is super easy – as they are everywhere! There is a belief among herbalists that the more prolific an herb, the more the benefits and the more we need it.

Today we are going to teach you how to make your very own salve – it is so simple!

 

How to make Dandelion Salve!

The first step to making your salve is to collect the dandelions. Next, you will be making an infusion from the flowers. You can dry them for a day first to get rid of some moisture or put them straight into a jar with oil. Make sure the oil covers the flowers. A 16 oz jar will yield about an 8 oz cup of oil.  You can choose your favourite oils like olive, coconut or sweet almond. For this recipe, I chose olive oil and avocado oil.

 

Let your oil sit in a dark place for a week. Don’t wait any longer or the oil will start to spoil. After a week, strain the flowers through cheesecloth. Squeeze hard! You want to get all the benefits of the flowers out. You will be left with a beautiful golden colour oil.

Dandelion Salve Recipe

For this recipe, you will need the Dandelion Infusion you just made and about 6 – 4 oz mason jars with labels. You can get these jars at any hardware store, grocery store, or can likely even re-purpose from jars you may have at home. The rest of the ingredients like beeswax, shea butter and essential oils are at any well-stocked health food store.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dandelion infused oil
  • 1 ounce beeswax
  • 1 ounce refined shea butter
  • 12-24 drops essential oils of your choice (lavender and sweet orange are two of my favourites)

Instructions

  1. Create a makeshift double boiler by putting a small bowl or a glass Pyrex measuring cup over a pot with about an inch of simmering water.
  2. Put the dandelion oil and beeswax into the small bowl or Pyrex, and heat until the beeswax completely dissolves into the oil, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add the shea butter and stir until it completely dissolves.
  4. Stir in the essential oils.
  5. Carefully pour the mixture into small jars or tins and let sit until the salve sets up completely.

 

Our salve turned out beautifully! The smell of the essential oils is glorious and the salve is so soothing for my hands, knees and elbows after a day in the garden. With the ingredients easily available, now is the time to get out and harvest your dandelion flowers before they are gone!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos courtesy of Linda Vanderstoop             

 

3 Big Mistakes Most Guys in Relationships Make…

 

That Keep Them Feeling Trapped, Resentful & Feeling Disconnected From Their Partner

by Kurt Frost

It may sound clichéd, but we live in difficult times for men.  The demands of work and family can spread your time and energy thin and our “A.D.D culture” makes it really hard to focus on what is important without the next thing immediately demanding our attention.  

As a result, guys get lost, and when we do, we lose touch with ourselves and what makes our lives exciting and full of  meaning.  Less meaning and excitement creates frustration, builds resentment and causes anxiety. Not only anxiety over feelings of overwhelm, that we can’t keep up, but a growing hopelessness that we are failing. That we may never live the life we want.  This loss of self-fulfillment comes back to hurt our relationships, family and generally the world around us.

Pretty depressing, eh? You may find yourself wondering how you got to this point, but there are definitely 3 big mistakes that most guys make that will pretty much guarantee getting stuck here.  You’ve probably made at least 1 of them if not all 3.

  1. Not Taking Care of Yourself

Most guys are bad at taking care of themselves.  It looks different for everyone, but some common examples of poor self care are:

  • Lack of exercise
  • Poor diet
  • Lack of time for yourself
  • Lack of time with other male friends
  • Poor sleep
  • Many more…

It happens for many reasons, but as you try to take care of everyone else, you do less and less for yourself and, over time, you end up being last in the quest to make sure everyone else is okay.  

This is definitely a recipe for disaster, as the less you do for your own well being, the less you have to give, much less function well in your life.

 

  1. Poor Communication with Partner

The effects of this one are probably the most obvious and at the surface for most guys in their relationships:

  • Feeling like you and your partner are “missing each other”;  your partner is not getting what you mean and you feel misunderstood by them too.
  • Being confused by your partner’s shifts in moods towards you; one minute you feel close and the next you are a jerk.
  • As much as you try to explain your thoughts about something, your partner is resistant and even antagonistic.  Maybe avoiding each other, or difficult subjects.
  • The list goes on…

Continued miscommunication in a relationship is toxic and will only increase the distance between you and your partner. This will undermine the rest of your life too, leading to effects in your self care and sense of purpose… it is all connected!

 

  1. Not Living With Purpose

Living on purpose means you live your life in a way that makes you feel energized and alive.  

If you don’t know where you are going, you won’t know how to get there… or even know if you got there.  It is like sailing a boat; if you don’t have your destination in sight, you will veer off course. And if you know anything about sailing, that is not a good thing.

“Life purpose” is a verb, not a noun. You need to “do” your life purpose in little ways each and every day.  Your purpose isn’t a goal, per se, but rather a way of being that you need to keep checking in with to see if you are on track.  

Put another way, it is you engaging all of you and feeling like you are moving towards a better version of yourself.

A big sign that you are not living with purpose is if you are feeling frustrated that your life is being defined for you by your partner, your kids, your boss, etc., etc., etc.  It feels controlling and leaves men often feeling angry and resentful.

All of this can change!

As you have seen, there are many ways for your life to get off track, but there are also many solutions you can implement to help you claim the life you desire and start living with the purpose you deserve.  

Men need their own space to get back in touch with what feels right. The Power of Purpose Retreat For Men does this. During this retreat you will address these 3 exact problems and leave with the solutions you need to be happier and excited about your life again! Find out how we will accomplish this here.

Coconut Cream Chia Pudding

Chia seeds are one of the healthiest of the new superfoods widely available in food markets today. They are loaded with nutrients that can have important benefits for your body and brain. 

Coconut Cream Chia Pudding is a delicious, easy to make treat packed with lots of nutrition! Vegan-friendly and gluten free, you can make one or more portions the night before to have throughout the week. Start with the basic recipe, adding in your favourite fruits and toppings.

Chia seeds were an important food for the Aztecs and Mayan who prized them for their ability to provide sustained energy.

In fact, “chia” is the ancient Mayan word for “strength.”

Despite their ancient history as a dietary staple, only recently did chia seeds become recognized as a modern-day superfood.

These tiny seeds pack a powerful nutritional punch.

A 1 ounce (28 grams) serving of chia seeds contains (1, 2):

  • Fiber: 11 grams
  • Protein: 4 grams
  • Fat: 9 grams (5 of which are Omega-3s)
  • Calcium: 18% of the RDA
  • Manganese: 30% of the RDA
  • Magnesium: 30% of the RDA
  • Phosphorus: 27% of the RDA
  • They also contain a decent amount of Zinc, Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Potassium, Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) and Vitamin B2.

The fiber and Omega 3’s in Chia seeds rate higher ounce for ounce than flaxseed.  Higher fiber with lots of Omega’s reduce your risk for diabetes type 2 and heart disease. One of the best features are the antioxidants which help the Omega oils from going rancid. So grab your empty mason jars (8oz) and get your breakfast of champions started!

COCONUT CREAM CHIA PUDDING
WITH MIXED BERRIES AND PECANS

Ingredients (per serving)

  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 3/4 cup coconut milk
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup (adjust sweetness to taste)

Mix chia seeds, coconut milk, and maple syrup together in a small bowl or glass mason jar. Let it set in the refrigerator. Stir mixture after half an hour and set back in the fridge. Repeat one more time. Leave overnight.

In the morning, remove it from the fridge, and make sure your pudding looks thick and the chia seeds have gelled.

Layer the coconut cream on top of the pudding (available at specialty food stores or the grocery store in ethnic aisle) then add fresh strawberries/blueberries and top with chopped pecans. Then grab a spoon and enjoy!

You can make 5 to 7 – 8oz. glass mason jars with the basic recipe and change up your breakfast to go every morning by using different fruits, nuts and seeds for a variety of tastes and texture.

P.S. It also makes a great dessert or afternoon snack!

Maple Sriracha Roasted Cauliflower

A guest recently shared a version of this recipe with me and I’ve loved it ever since. I’ve tweaked it a bit of course (cuz that’s what I do) and every guest I’ve shared it with has loved it.

If you are looking for a super quick side dish that’s unique then here’s your answer!     ~ Liz

Ingredients

  • 1 large head cauliflower, cut into bite sized florets
  • 1/8 cup olive oil
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 tsp sriracha – could use more if you like it hot
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk all ingredients together until combined. Add the cauliflower and toss until well coated.
  3. Spread on a baking sheet, and bake, flipping once during baking, until golden brown and tender (approx 25 min).
  4. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro and serve with additional sriracha sauce if desired.

Pro Tip: If you want less mess for clean up, line the baking sheet with parchment paper!

What are the benefits of mindfulness?

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In addition to the aforementioned benefits, the following list are also realistic outcomes from practicing mindfulness:

Gains in working memory

Stress reduction

Less emotional reactivity 

Relationship satisfaction 

Numerous research articles have run studies on mindfulness and have discovered meditation has been directly related to self-reported positive affect. More interestingly, these results reveal that even short-term commitment show marked differences in the brains of people who practice mindful meditation versus those who do not practice mindful meditation. A study involving people with mindful practice ranging from one month to twenty-nine years were compared to a pool of people who hadn’t meditated. When shown graphic pictures, the former group was better able to disengage from the stimuli and instead focus on a cognitive task versus those who had no practice with mindful meditation.

More insights and explanations from these research studies, along the other uses of mindfulness can be found here: http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/07-08/ce-corner.aspx 

 

We invite you to practice mindfulness with us as we guide you on your journey to your inner wise self. Join us this January 1st for our “Get Clear on Your Year” retreat.

https://www.sugarridge.ca/retreats/event/get-clear-on-your-year-week-retreat